Go to ...

The Newspapers

Gathering and spreading news from various Russian Newspapers

The Newspapers on Google+The Newspapers on LinkedInRSS Feed

Saturday, April 14, 2018

Poroshenko is rapidly losing its “nuclear electorate”


The international Republican Institute of the USA (whose opinion, like it or not, and it is necessary to take into account) published data conducted in December 2017, the first year of a nationwide survey. It turned out that the sympathy rating in the post-Soviet Republic to the present leader again renewed its historical minimum.


photo: facebook.com

If at the end of may 2014, Petro Poroshenko won in the second round of the presidential elections (gaining more than 50 percent of the votes), now only 14 percent of these belong to Peter Alekseevich generally positive. For reference: in April 2017 these optimists was 22 percent.

The share of those who assessed the activities of the 5th President of the Square on a solid “poor” jumped to 76 percent.

Slightly better look the electoral sympathy for the protege Poroshenko Vladimir Groisman. The Prime Minister certainly support 16 percent of compatriots, while “minus” in relation to Vladimir Borisovich spoke 75 percent of Ukrainians.

Flush with Groysman in “American-Republican ranking” is – with its 16 per cent “for” the leader of Pro-Russian “Opposition bloc” Yuriy Boyko. Negative assessment of the native of Gorlovka, the second populous city in Donetsk oblast (now controlled by authorities of the DNI) – put 67 percent of Ukrainians.

The perennial political opponent of the above Trinity – Yulia Tymoshenko – was, according to the national

Institute of the USA (IRI), 19 percent. Like a good idea. However, in April 2017 the level of sympathy for Yulia Tymoshenko was 22 percent. The level of antipathy towards the leader of “Batkivshchyna” – 70 percent.

IRI today acquainted also with the balance of political forces on the eve of a hypothetical parliamentary elections. They come in the near future, “Block of Petro Poroshenko”, with its 6 percent is not even got in the top three! The current BPP ally in Parliament – “people’s front” and all would have gained 1 percent…

In this category the leader of the “Fatherland” Yulia Tymoshenko: 10 percent. Second and third places with 7% of votes from the Opposition bloc and the new party “For life”. Both political forces clearly articulate the Pro-Russian stance and support the unconditional withdrawal from military positions in the Donbas units of the Ukrainian security officers from various volunteer battalions.

The five-percent threshold, according to IRI, also overcomes the “Civic position” ex-defense Minister Anatoly Gritsenko. The vision of this policy vary significantly with the views of the leaders of the party “For life” former Kharkov Evgeniy murayev and Vadim Rabinovich. Mr. S., in particular, convinced of the need… the physical elimination of one of the leaders of the Russian Federation.

The new composition of the Verkhovna Rada will hardly “Radical party” of Oleh Liashko (4%), the nationalist “Freedom” and “National movement Dmitry Yarosh” (respectively 3 and 1 percent of the vote). So Mr. Gritsenko with their extreme views is likely to remain in Parliament alone.

However, it does not go to any comparison with the mood of the current President Poroshenko. Neither he personally, nor close to him political parties and movements, if to rely on data from the International Republican Institute of the United States, in the preservation of the existing “Law on elections in Ukraine” in 2019, you do not have the slightest chance to preserve their influence on what is happening in neighbouring Russia a Slavic country.

Get short formal newsletter the best in the “MK” – subscribe to our Telegram.

source

Related posts:
Closeout Ukrainian chernozems will only strengthen the country's corruption
Trump announced when determined with the sanctions against Iran
Microsoft CEO accused North Korea of cyber attack WannaCry
Do not repent, we: published a letter from Filaret to Patriarch Kirill

Recommended

More Stories From Politics