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Saturday, October 22, 2016

The comet struck the sun. This time it is not “exploded”

The collision of the comet with the Sun was recorded in the night of 3 August 4, an American spacecraft SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory). The trajectory of celestial bodies, suggesting the imminent collision with the star was determined by astronomers on August 1. The comet belonged to the solar Kreutz family of comets with similar orbits.

photo: nasa.gov

Dramatic event — the convergence of the comet with the Sun at speeds exceeding one million kilometers per hour, and collapse it into several parts when approaching the star managed to fix the SOHO. As commented in NASA, it was destroyed by a powerful radiation.

How often comet “bump” into the Sun? This question we asked the specialist IZMIRAN (Institute of terrestrial magnetism and radio wave propagation of RAS) Sergey GIDISU.

– Such events happen several times a year, responsible scientist. – Differ only in the size of comets. The one in question was small, which we refer to ordinary cases. But it happens that the Sun flying at full speed a huge comet. That a few years ago caused a serious panic, which erupted on the Earth through the fault of your brother, a journalist. It so happened that at the moment of approach of the comet to the Sun, approximately in the region where “aiming” the uninvited guest, there was a big flash and a powerful ejection of solar material in different directions. In the picture it looked like an explosion caused by a collision with a comet. The media and filed the incident: “the Sun, an explosion occurred due to a collision with a comet,” although in fact no comet can’t hurt the Sun, because just before it reached him.

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