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Saturday, October 22, 2016

Block images pop concerts will be the example of intelligence

Our gadgets can withdraw not all that we want. This was proved by the specialists of a major American company in the creation of IT-technologies, which has developed a method to lock a record with the help of photo and video cameras during concerts, museums and other public places.

photo: morguefile.com

The method is based on the impact on personal cameras and video cameras are coded infrared (IR) rays. In places where photography is prohibited, landlords can install special emitters that are configured to lock the recording function of any electronic devices.

Users can be actors, not wishing to have their photos taken from the audience. The fact that raised up smartphones one the audience often block the stage others. In addition to concerts, the IR-protection from unauthorized shooting can use the guide to museums and theaters. The footage, which as a result will have “pirates” will be exposed to the IR beam, and the photo or video instead of an image will show off a big spot.

Review of a specialist in opto-electronic systems Vladimir IVANOV:

-These methods have long been used by intelligence agencies when they need to protect from shooting one or another secret facility. The IR beam falls on the focal surface of the camera spoils the image, making it indistinguishable. In principle, normally closed once technologies become an object of mass use. Such automatic blocking of unwanted filming was a long time coming, since the activity of some users of the gadgets, at times, exceeds all limits. As for person, he she to harm, most likely, will not. The human eye can’t see blocking the beam, because it acts on the reach of our vision wavelength.

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