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Sunday, October 23, 2016

Blue light helps to think quickly and act decisively

During the Denver conference Sleep2016 scientists from Arizona state University shared the results of his new study, according to which under the influence of blue man begins to make decisions faster and better able to concentrate.

photo: morguefile.com

In the experiment, organized by scientists, was attended by 35 people, whose age ranged from 18 to 32 years. Volunteers were divided into two groups, one of which offered to perform a series of tasks in a room illuminated with blue light, while other try to cope with the same challenges in lighting yellow. The researchers watched the brain activity of each participant using functional magnetic resonance imaging.

According to specialists, half an hour after the inclusion of blue lighting in those participants who fell into the appropriate group, recorded growth in the level of cognitive ability, and observed a beneficial effect even after 40 minutes after the light was turned off. Yellow lighting so bright effect on study participants is not provided. In particular, for the same period of time volunteers from “blue lighting” answered more questions than those who fell in the “group of yellow lighting”. Objective measures obtained through MRI, have also confirmed this relationship.

According to scientists, their work not only helps to better understand the relationship between the hue of the lighting and thinking, but also to find practical application of this information — in particular, to consider the possibility of installing lamps of a different color where the normal sun light for one reason or another unavailable.

The research of experts published in the journal Sleep.

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